« Stayin Alive! | Main | Sooo many things, so little time! »

Comments

Amanda

I think that you have hit this right on. I have had conversations with people explaining how I felt like life was a war. One has to fight to get what they want and even though they are so small and insignificant compared to the rest of the world, they continue to fight and then they fall over and over again, each time proving more difficult to stand back up. This seems to produce fear of everything, and then we walk through our mundane, meloncholy lives knowing that surely there is something bigger and better for us. We just can't seem to reach it.
But we have become blind to the little things, the simple things that are meant to satisfy our hearts and leave us content with where we are at in life, and where we are going.
It does affect who we are. We become a mixture of things, and we think that is ok, until someone asks us "Who are you?" Then there is the long pause because we have no idea what the answer is. And even if we knew we might not say for fear of ridicule and rejection.

Yet again, another great post. Thanks!! Amanda

Brent

Good thoughts, Adam. The complexity of life is the one thing that I think I began (emphasis on "began") to grasp in my last couple of years of school. And you are right that we are terribly unjust in our oversimplified approaches to one another; I'm sure the reasons are many, but why do you think we do that? Can it be avoided?

By the way, this is Brent Newsom. I found you through Porter's blog.

meg

Adam,
spoken eloquently as a recovering fundamentalist. You have it dead on. American Fundamentalism was created as a knee-jerk reaction to the second wave of immigration which brought Catholics from Ireland and Italy causing the primarily Protestant population of America to feel threatened and thus to engage in a defensiveness from the world. (see George Marsden's classic work: Understanding Evangelicalism and Fundamentalism for more)
Its REALLY important (in my mind anyway) that you distinguish these false steps/reactionary tendencies as part of a Fundamentalist Christianity and perhaps not the totality of Christian thought, life and practice. Jesus said, he was the vine and we are the branches and I happen to believe that he DELIGHTS, not cringes, as we enjoy the world around us.
(whew! long post!)

Jason

"I am only thinking that we, all of us, would be so much happier, so much more free, if we were to cease living our lives in fear of each other. If we could accept that we are all so very complicated. That we cannot be handled in a moment or in a thought, but only through a lifetime of understanding."

I don't think that I have read a better thought than this in a long time. I, too, wonder what life would be like should we ever get the "stones" to take the time to like, love, get to know one another outside of the preconceived notions that we have been taught...

I hope you are well...

grace and peace

Nicole

The fecundity and organicity of life is why I love being a psychologist. It's just such a privelege to hear the things some people never tell other people, and to walk with them through that messy ugly stuff.

The comments to this entry are closed.